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Learning by Doing Simulations for Free

Understanding Complex Topics Is Challenging

When knowledge feels inaccessible and subjects become mazes, students' progress grinds to a halt. Students face several significant challenges:

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Superficial Understanding: Without interactive practice, the grasp of complex concepts remains shallow, limiting the ability to effectively apply this knowledge in real-world situations.
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Lack of Engagement: Traditional study methodologies can be dull and demotivating, especially for subjects that require deep and active understanding.
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Risk of Falling Behind: In an increasingly competitive academic environment, not keeping up with innovative learning methods can put students at a disadvantage.
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Inefficient Studying: Without a tool to guide practical learning, students spend more time and effort understanding less content.

Our online simulators are designed to overcome these obstacles, ensuring that every student not only understands but masters complex subjects in a practical and applied manner. Don't let the lack of proper tools limit your academic success.

Benefits of Online Educational Simulators

Discover the specific advantages offered by online educational simulation tools:

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Practical learning approach: Hands-on learning methods are ideal for complex subjects as they ensure deep understanding, maintain engagement, and improves academic performance.
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Compatible with e-Learning: By definition, simulators are the perfect complement to e-Learning, as both approach learning from the same angle.
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Cost Reduction: In general, digital solutions allow us to scale more economically than physical ones. The marginal cost of new digital units is much lower than that of their physical counterparts. This is similar to what happens in other sectors such as the publishing or music industry.
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Unlimited size: There are concepts or phenomena that physically cannot fit into any laboratory, and if they could, the cost would be exorbitant (for example: an ecosystem, a country's economy, or a complex industrial process).
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Unlimited Time Scale: Simulators allow us to observe in detail both what happens when the time scale is very small (for example, transients in electrical circuits) and what occurs when the scale is very large (such as social phenomena, which take years or decades to develop).
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Availability and Flexibility: By deploying simulators in the cloud, they will be available at any time from anywhere (including the classroom). There is no need to schedule practice sessions for students to take turns in the lab, allowing students to access them at any moment.
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Simple Measurements: Unless the goal of the practice sessions is to learn about metrology, measurements are very simple and easily reproducible when using digital simulators.
Often, when conducting a physical experiment, we are more focused on making measurements correctly within the opportunity window provided by the experiment than on the object of the experiment itself.
Moreover, in physical experiments, there are often variables of interest that are not available, at least not directly or easily. When it comes to measuring physical quantities (for example: temperature, pressure, current intensity, etc.), these can be difficult to access or the sensors needed to measure them can be very costly. In social sciences, it is common for variables of interest to be measured indirectly through intermediate variables that act as proxies.
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No Ethical Dilemmas: Conducting in vivo experiments with humans or animals often involves ethical dilemmas (for example, experimenting with human physiology raises serious ethical and moral issues). However, simulation allows us to conduct in silico experiments with complete peace of mind.
Although perhaps not as obvious as experimentation with humans or animals, there are other situations that also pose ethical or moral problems, such as experimentation in ecology. In reality, we cannot provoke an ecological collapse for scientific purposes, but in a simulator, it is entirely feasible.
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Zero Risk: It is possible to address subjects that would be dangerous for the student in a safe manner (for example, simulating radioactive decay).